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By David Cooley, DDS
December 03, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: soda  

If you want to maintain good oral health find out why you shouldn’t drink soda.

Sometimes it seems like nothing is more satiating than cracking open a nice, bubbling bottle or can of soda, but while this habit may quell your cravings it’s not as kind to your smile. If you don’t want your Kalamazoo dentist Dr. David Cooley to find any cavities at your sodanext visit then find out why you should stay away from soda.

Why is soda dangerous for your smile?

From the first to the final sip you are causing damage to your beautiful smile. Every time you take a swig of soda the sugars in it feed the bacteria in your mouth causing them to produce acid.

These acid attacks then wear down healthy enamel to cause decay. Each time you sip that soft drink the damaging effects from the acid last about 20 minutes. And if you are a heavy soda consumer, you better believe that you are causing some serious issues for your smile.

What dental problems can happen if I drink soda?

There are two big issues that soda can cause for your smile: dental erosion and cavities.

Erosion happens when the acid comes in contact with tooth enamel, which gradually softens this protective layer and leaves it prone to cavities. Those who drink soda regularly will often develop more cavities than those who don’t consume soda. And if you are a person who not only drinks sodas often but also isn’t the best when it comes to brushing and flossing their teeth, then you may have even more visits with your Kalamazoo, MI general dentist in your future.

How can I protect my smile from acid damage?

While the most obvious solution is to stop drinking soda altogether, we know that this isn’t always the easiest or the most realistic. So for those patients in Kalamazoo that just can’t seem to kick this habit, here are some better habits you can adopt:

  • Only drink in moderation (No more than one soda a day, which can still do damage; try to limit it to only one soda a week, if possible).
  • The longer it takes you to consume soda the longer acid will remain on your teeth to cause damage. So, next time you open that soda, drink it quickly.
  • Drink out of a straw, which will reduce how much acid comes in contact with your teeth.
  • Drink water right after consuming soda to help wash away acid and sugar.
  • Avoid soda in the evening, when sugar and acid can wreak havoc on your teeth while you sleep.

Avoiding sugar as much as possible will certainly go a long way in protecting your smile, as will those routine cleanings. If it’s time for your biannual visit, what are you waiting for? Call Dr. Cooley’s office today!

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